Your Criteria for consent surrounding minors and medical treatments or procedures isn't set out by the federal government, but by provinces and territories own legislation. Elsewhere, criteria are found in common law.

A minor is a person under the age of majority, which varies across provinces and territories (Provincial definitions of a minor - Canada.ca,). In provinces or territories where there is no set legislation or stipulated age of consent for minors, common law governs.

The Supreme Court of Canada endorsed what is known as the “mature minor” doctrine in 2009, which means that a child of any age can give consent if they have the maturity and capacity to make informed decisions and understand the consequences of said decisions.

It is questionable as to whether the ‘mature minor” doctrine applies given the Covid 19 shots are not fully approved and are still in clinical trials. The Mature Minor doctrine cannot override the wishes and consent of the parents outside of the emergency threat of imminent harm or death. The administration of an experimental medical treatment, without the informed consent of the parent/guardian, is a crime against humanity and is contrary to the Criminal Code of Canada, stemming from the Nuremberg Code and Helsinki Declaration of 1964.

In Canada, it's the law. Your consent must be voluntary and informed.

You should be informed of:

  1. The nature of the treatment
  2. The expected benefits of the treatment
  3. The material risks of the treatment
  4. The material side effects of the treatment
  5. Alternative courses of action
  6. The likely consequences of not having the treatment

If you weren't provided with this information, if your decision was made as a result of pressure, and if you didn't receive the vaccine protocol that you agreed to, then what you experienced was NOT voluntary, informed consent.

Check information within your regions. Some regions have been specific about age of consent for minors.

Always make sure that all your questions are answered before you give consent to any treatment.

Resources:

  1. https://www.lawnow.org/youth-the-law-medical-treatment-when-can-i-give-my-own-consent/
  2. https://www.cmpa-acpm.ca/en/advice-publications/handbooks/consent-a-guide-for-canadian-physicians
  3. https://cps.ca/en/documents/position/medical-decision-making-in-paediatrics-infancy-to-adolescence
  4. https://priv.gc.ca/en/privacy-topics/collecting-personal-information/consent/gl_omc_201805/#_consent
  5. https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/science-research/science-advice-decision-making/research-ethics-board/consent-process.html
  6. https://e-dmj.org/file/WMA-Declaration_of_Helsinki-2013.pdf
  7. https://ethics.gc.ca/eng/policy-politique_tcps2-eptc2_2018.html
  8. Vaccines for children: COVID-19 - Canada.ca
  9. https://www.siskinds.com/consent-of-minors-to-medical-treatment/

See each Province and Territory with unique information:

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